Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj <p>“<em>Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological, and Practical Studies</em> will be a peer-reviewed journal published online which will be given oversight by an editorial board composed of individuals representing various Wesleyan institutions throughout Africa.”</p> <p>The objectives of <em>Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological, and Practical Studies</em> are the following:</p> <ol> <li>to make a contribution to scholarship in the Wesleyan tradition, especially within the African continent;</li> <li>to encourage collaboration between the various partner institutions;</li> <li>to promote the doctrine of holiness throughout Africa and beyond;</li> <li>to collaborate with other academics in other disciplines to contribute to the discovery of truth;</li> <li>to encourage and mentor new scholars through the publication of the journal and other resources.</li> </ol> <p><em>Transform</em> will publish scholarly articles and critical reviews of literature from a Wesleyan perspective for the Church in Africa and beyond. The peer-reviewed journal is published once a year by the following Wesleyan institutions in Africa:</p> <ul> <li>Africa University, Mutare, Zimbabwe</li> <li>Banyam Theological Seminary, Jalingo, Taraba</li> <li>Bishop John G. Innis Graduate School of Theology, United Methodist University, Liberia</li> <li>Hope Africa University, Bujumbura, Burundi</li> <li>Kenya Highlands University, Kericho, Kenya</li> <li>Methodist Theological Institute, Umuahia, Nigeria</li> <li>Nazarene Theological College, Republic of South Africa</li> <li>Nazarene Theological College of Central Africa, Lilongwe, Malawi</li> <li>Pilgrim Wesleyan College, Pemba, Zambia</li> <li>School of Religion and Christian Ministry of Africa Nazarene University, Nairobi, Kenya</li> <li>Southern Africa Nazarene University, Manzini, Eswatini</li> <li>UMCA Theological College, Pemba, Zambia</li> <li>Wesley University, Ondo, Nigeria</li> <li>Wesleyan College of Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia</li> <li>West Africa Theological Seminary, Lagos, Nigeria</li> </ul> <p>In addition, Transform will be partnering with other individual scholars.</p> en-US Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition 2790-9360 Holiness and Its Implications in Private and Public Life https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/5 <p>This article discusses holiness and its implication in the private and public life of believers. There have been problems understanding whether the Christian’s private holy life impacts how he/she lives in public life. This problem has been the cradle of debates among scholars of various traditions, all of them citing biblical scriptures to defend their positions. There are two extremes. On the one hand are those who emphasize that Christians have nothing to do in public affairs—mostly citing Johannine theology—his epistles and the book of Revelation. On the other hand, are those who take the other extreme, citing among other passages Matthew 5:13-16 that states Christians are the salt and the light of the world. This problem has to be examined critically if Christians genuinely serve God and humans in this world, as they look forward to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. This article’s methodology to accomplish its intended aim and outcome is a biblical exploration with a bit of light exegetical reflection and survey of some of the Old Testament prophetic oracles—Isaiah, Micah, and Zechariah. The major finding for this article is that God demands holiness in the life of believers and that it deals with all areas of the Christian life, both private and public. The recommendation for this article is that, rather than withdrawing the believers from their public life’s affairs, holiness thrusts them into the world to be the salt and the light so that people may see their good deeds and praise their Father who is in heaven. The conclusion is that the God who is holy is the God who demands justice in the everyday life affairs of his people—including in the public arena because such a posture exemplifies His holy character.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Hermann Mvula Copyright (c) 2022 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 1 19 Paul’s Teaching on Food Offered to Idols in 1Corinthians 8:1-13, 10: 23-11:1 and Its Implication for Christianity in Africa https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/2 <p>This article examines Paul’s teaching on food offered to idols in 1 Corinthians 8:1-13 and 10:23-11:1 and its implication for Wesleyan Christianity in Africa. The approach is qualitative as it enables one to explore ideas, words, and meanings. The historical-critical method and contextual tools are used to interpret the biblical text. As an apostle of freedom, Paul advocated absolute freedom in Christ and the freedom to restrict or sacrifice one’s freedoms for another’s sake. Believers find freedom at its best when they abide by ‘Paul’s five ground-rules for life together in Christ’. This study spotlights the challenge of telling and living out the good news in everyday life as well as the ‘challenge to allow the gospel to address and confront, when necessary, issues of everyday Christian conduct’ with the African worldview. The study also reveals that the participants in eating food offered to idols are subjects for redemption and thus need specific pastoral attention.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Valentine Mbachi Hope Amolo Copyright (c) 2022 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 20 31 Contrasting the Properity Gospel with the Holiness Gospel in Ministerial Preparation in Theological Institute https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/8 <p> </p> <p><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>Many pastors have different ideas to justify why they preach prosperity or holiness in their churches. This extremism in the preaching of the gospel has caused many problems to the spiritual vitality of the church. Thus, the role of theological education is vital in equipping men and women with sound biblical truth so that they are better prepared for Christian ministry. The gospel of holiness reveals God’s nature. God is holy, and He expects His children to live a godly life (1 Peter 1:16). The gospel of holiness is holistic; it entails a deep relationship with God through daily devotion, obedience, and creation care. On the contrary, the prosperity gospel emphasises material possession and physical well-being. According to the scriptures, it is God’s will for Christians to live in affluence, but that is not the primary focus of the gospel (Romans 14:17). This paper seeks to examine the idea of the gospel of holiness and prosperity through critical analysis from a theological standpoint. Library and online survey approaches were adopted in the study. Based on the study’s outcome, a recommendation was made to strengthen theological education for the training of pastors for effective Christian ministry.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Chinyere Priest Victor Priest Chukwuma Copyright (c) 2022 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 32 46 Interethnic conflict in Kenya: https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/7 <p>Kenya has a long history of inherent inter-ethnic conflicts. Some of these conflicts affect the social and economic activities among warring communities. Inter-ethnic conflicts have been accused of contributing significantly to the loss of lives, property, and increased poverty levels. The main content of this article is the result of the author’s Master of Arts in Religion thesis at Africa Nazarene University, conducted in Marsabit County in 2007 and entitled ‘The Investigation of the Causes of Conflicts between Borana and Gabra Pastoral Communities of Northern Kenya and Ways of Conflicts Prevention and Reconciliation’. The Bible has a great voice when applied to conflict prevention and reconciliation. With that in mind, the article supports biblical principles for mitigating destructive conflicts. The research methodology used for this paper was a descriptive survey. In addition, synchronic approaches to biblical texts were applied to various texts, which views the Biblical text as a complete piece of divinely inspired literature. Thus, the study adopts an approach to the text, understanding the meaning of words that precisely consider their <em>referential </em>quality (what the text says) and <em>mimetic </em>quality (what the text is all about). The research found nine causes of interethnic conflict among warring tribes: revenge; the aftermath of drought; reckless talks from political elites; disrespect to people’s property; tribalism and negative ethnicity; historical injustices; failure to respect political boundaries; government laxity; and ethnic enclaves. As a result, the article recommends the following biblical responses to prevent interethnic conflict: seek no revenge; store up in times of plenty; control the tongue; love and respect for the neighbour; created in the image of God; sharing available resources; respect for political boundaries; governing with justice and mercy; and, choosing good leaders.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Patrick Mburu Kamau Copyright (c) 2022 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 47 60 Missionary Strategies of the Apostle Paul for Church Growth https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/4 <p><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>The Apostle Paul, one of the earliest and most influential leaders, made a profound and lasting impact upon Christian thought. Throughout his ministry, he considered the proclamation of the gospel a prime task as he was called and urged by God to proclaim Christ. Because he proclaimed the gospel, new communities developed consisting of Jews and Gentiles alike. Paul planted these communities, helped them reflect on their identity, and shaped their lives. His view of these new communities was that they formed the beginning of the ‘new creation’ that God was about to establish. There is every reason to consider Paul’s aim with these communities as a missionary: these communities were composed of those who confessed Christ as the Lord would contribute to the further spread of the gospel. Paul focused his activities primarily on cities, regions, and provinces that could enhance the possibilities for further spreading the gospel due to their economic status. By proclaiming and raising communities in various locations, Paul hoped to light a fire that would subsequently spread on its own accord (2 Corinthians 5:11-6:2). He also employed strategies of social groups, persuasion of the message, credibility of the messenger, an explanation for missionary success, the principle of accommodation, use of fellow-workers, and ensuring that the churches were self-governing-self-supporting-self-extending. Paul’s mission strategy resulted in the establishment of the churches and therefore forms a framework for mission workers in this century. This article argues that his plans are valuable and adaptable.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> Samuel Oketch Copyright (c) 2022 Samuel Oketch https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 61 81 Tredoux, Johan. Mildred Bangs Wynkoop: Her Life and Thought. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/6 Thomas Cahill Copyright (c) 2021 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 82 84 Brant Pitre, Michael P. Barber, and John A. Kincaid. Paul, A New Covenant Jew: Rethinking Pauline Theology. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/11 Halissone Nefitala Copyright (c) 2021 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 85 87 Wright, N.T. God and the Pandemic: a Christian Reflection on the Coronavirus and its Aftermath. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/1 Ben van Vuuren Copyright (c) 2021 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 88 90 Katembo, Fabrice S. The Mystery of the Church: Applying Paul’s Ecclesiology in Africa. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/10 Russell Frazier Copyright (c) 2021 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 91 93 Oduyoye, Amba Mercy. African Women’s Theologies, Spirituality, and Healing: Theological Perspectives from the Circle of Concerned African Women Theologians. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/9 Vincent Pascal Gucha Copyright (c) 2021 Transform: A Journal of Biblical, Theological and Practical Studies in the Wesleyan Tradition https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 94 97 Katho, Bungishabaku. Reading Jeremiah in Africa: Biblical Essays in Sociopolitical Imagination. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/13 Michael Blythe Copyright (c) 2022 Michael Blythe https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 98 100 Mwailu, Daniel Mathano. To Be Like Jesus: An Appraisal of Biblical Theology in Practice of Personal and Ministerial Spiritual Formation. https://ojs.anu.ac.ke/index.php/soj/article/view/14 Calum Samuelson Copyright (c) 2022 Calum Samuelson https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0 2022-03-03 2022-03-03 1 1 101 103